What does Michelangelo’s nude David have in common with a Walmart baseball bat?

What does Michelangelo’s nude David have in common with a Walmart baseball bat?
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Apparently, an outraged parent called the nude figure pornographic. And that outraged Gaudet.

“I said, ‘If you see porno in that world (the world of classical art), well, let me show it to you in your world,” Gaudet recalled.






Mississippi artist Mitchell Gaudet expressed his outrage at a Culture Wars conflict in Florida by comically exhibiting symbolically sexual objects he bought at Walmart




Gaudet, 60, said he shops at Walmart at least weekly, and considered it the perfect all-American crossroads to make his point. He sped to the big box store to expose the symbolic sexuality hiding everywhere.

He composed a lengthy artists’ manifesto in which he lambasted the Florida firing. “If things keep going the way they are going, good luck buying a plunger or a trailer hitch,” he concluded.

The exhibit opened on April Fools’ Day at Studio Waveland.

Sure, Gaudet said, the show’s a joke.

And it’s not. Gaudet’s collection of Walmart purchases may be tongue-in-cheek, but his fury over Michelangelo’s David being taboo in 21st-century America is sincere. 

“On it’s face, this is lighthearted,” he said, “but we’re going down the wrong path.”







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Mississippi artist Mitchell Gaudet expressed his outrage at a Culture Wars conflict in Florida by comically exhibiting symbolically sexual objects he bought at Walmart




“Gabinetto Segreto” isn’t Gaudet’s first foray into social commentary. He annually builds a sculpture that tallies the number of murders in his former hometown, which he displays near the steps of New Orleans’ City Hall to engage passersby in conversation.

So far, he said, only a handful of people have seen the secret cabinet show. “It was like going into the woods and screaming, and 15 people heard me,” he said.

He’s disappointed at the lack of attention, but not entirely unhappy. The project was fun and he got some of his angst off his chest, he explained.

All the symbolically masculine objects in the show are for sale, for the same price that Gaudet paid for them. The cash register receipt serves as the gallery price list.

The exhibit continues through April, after which the artist plans to try to return as many items as possible to Walmart. 

“It’s an expensive joke,” he said. “I don’t have $600.”

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About Mary Weyand 14484 Articles
Mary founded Scoop Tour with an aim to bring relevant and unaltered news to the general public with a specific view point for each story catered by the team. She is a proficient journalist who holds a reputable portfolio with proficiency in content analysis and research. With ample knowledge about the Automobile industry, she also contributes her knowledge for the Automobile section of the website.

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